Our Best Words Blog

clip_image001One of the best ways to promote a company is with opinion articles. Many magazines (online and hard copy) welcome well-written articles. These articles should not be biased though – nobody wants to read a (blatant) sales pitch. As marketing professions will tell you – educating your target audience/potential customers is an effective marketing strategy.
Before starting to write, identify the target audience. Who are the readers of the magazine you want to send the article to? What are their interests? Do you have a direct connection to the editor, or only via a PR company? Does the magazine allow hyperlinks? Do they also want original illustrations? In short – do your homework!
Many marketing and copywriters ghostwrite – they write the opinion pieces for a company’s CEO, CMO or CTO, and when published, it will be under their name.
Points of attention when writing an opinion piece:

  1. It must be informative. The reader should learn something from reading the article.
  2. It must be interesting. The text should flow and keep the reader interested to go on reading.
  3. It must be based on facts, and not assumptions. References to recent events that were covered in the global media are a good hook, as are reports of leading analysts such as Gartner and Forrester.
  4. It must be neutral. As mentioned before, nobody wants to read a sales pitch. A neutral article covering new or future trends, or “how to…” articles are popular. At the end of the year, articles about predictions for the coming year are in demand.
  5. It should have hyperlinks (if allowed by the newspaper), footnotes and references. It makes the article trustworthy and increases the chance for publication.
  6. Most magazines will ask for illustrations. Try to have original images in high resolution. No matter what industry you are in, the chance that your competitors use the same stock photos is high. Diagrams are always popular in tech pieces, as are product photos. Make sure to send different photos to various magazines – don’t forget, they all want to have original content!
  7. Custom write your story tailored to each magazine. Sending the same article to several tech magazines is professional suicide, especially in today’s viral media.
  8. Make sure to put a short bio with contact details at the bottom of the article.
  9. Follow up. Once you see that your article in published, drop a thank-you note to the magazine (or journalist). Blog and tweet about it, and make sure to include the URL of the publication.

Immigrants who made Aliyah within the last 10 years could qualify for an 80% scholarship through the Misrad Haklita Voucher Program

Jerusalem – May 19, 2011 – Our Best Words (OBW), a Jerusalem-based company providing technical writing services and training, announced today that it opens its 4th technical & marketing writing course.

Topics include:

  • Technical Writing – writing, editing, proofreading, using graphics, online help
  • Information/Document Development – API, medical, hardware/software documentation
  • Skills – advanced use of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook Project and document management
  • MarCom – marketing, marketing writing, PR, social media

Since Tzfat is a hub of talented English-speaking professionals, we are opening our 4th course there to help immigrants and veterans start a new career as a technical writer,” said Ephraim King, CEO of Our Best Words. “Our program also includes an internship and assistance with employment placement.”

The course will take place on Thursdays from 9:30 till 18:30 at the Merkaz Tze’irim, 10 HaNasi St. in Tzfat.

Starting 7 July 2011, the 152-hour course consists of 8-hour sessions during 19 weeks.

The price is NIS11,000 (which includes a state-of-the art laptop with a fully licensed copy of MS Office 2010) or NIS 9,000 without a laptop. Additional discounts are available for AACI members.

Want to learn more? Contact us for an interview and placement test at:

Our Best Words Main Office: 02-656-3369
US & Canada: 1-786-507-8206

Ephraim King, CEO: 050-529-0775
Tracey Shipley, Marketing Coordinator: 054-810-8918
Email: info@ourbestwords.com
Website: http://www.technicalwriting.co.il/training/tech-writing-course-tzfat/

About Our Best Words
Our Best Words (OBW) specializes in providing quality technical communications to customers worldwide. The Company enjoys close relationships with a broad range of businesses – from startups to Fortune 500 companies. Offerings include corporate technical documentation, localization, technical communication, and technical marketing services worldwide. The Our Best Words team is comprised of experienced and dedicated professionals with years of experience in technical and marketing communications.
Visit OBS website at: www.ourbestwords.com

English-speaking immigrants and veterans are invited to come to the orientation evening on Sunday 5 June 2011 at 18:30

Jerusalem – May 19, 2011 – Our Best Words (OBW), a Jerusalem-based company providing technical writing services and training, announced today that it opens its 4th technical & marketing writing course.

Topics include:

  • Technical Writing – writing, editing, proofreading, using graphics, online help
  • Information/Document Development – API, medical, hardware/software documentation
  • Skills – advanced use of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook Project and document management
  • MarCom – marketing, marketing writing, PR, social media

Since Netanya is a hub of talented English-speaking professionals and close to various high-tech areas, we are opening our 3rd course there to help immigrants and veterans start a new career as a technical writer,” said Ephraim King, CEO of Our Best Words. “Immigrants who made Aliyah within the last 10 years could qualify for an 80% scholarship through the Misrad Haklita Voucher Program. Furthermore, our offering also includes an internship and assistance with employment placement.”

The course will take place on Sunday evenings at Beit Oleh America Netanya AACI, 28 Shmuel Hanatziv in Netanya. The orientation evening will take place at the same location.

Starting 3 July 2011, the 152-hour course consists of 4-hour sessions during 38 weeks.

The price is NIS 11,000 (which includes a state-of-the art laptop with a fully licensed copy of MS Office 2010) or NIS 9,000 without a laptop. Additional discounts are available for AACI members.

Want to learn more? Contact us for an interview and placement test at:

Our Best Words Main Office: 02-656-3369
US & Canada: 1-786-507-8206

Ephraim King, CEO: 050-529-0775
Tracey Shipley, Marketing Coordinator: 054-810-8918
Email: info@ourbestwords.com
Website: http://www.technicalwriting.co.il/tech-writing-course-netanya/

About Our Best Words
Our Best Words (OBW) specializes in providing quality technical communications to customers worldwide. The Company enjoys close relationships with a broad range of businesses – from startups to Fortune 500 companies. Offerings include corporate technical documentation, localization, technical communication, and technical marketing services worldwide. The Our Best Words team is comprised of experienced and dedicated professionals with years of experience in technical and marketing communications.
Visit OBS website at: www.ourbestwords.com

Organizations, SME/SMB, celebrities, individuals – we all need and use social media to drum up clip_image002business, to find work, to fight for a cause, or to be part of a community.

But before starting to use LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter, it’s important to formulate a strategy.

Formulate your goal
Why do you want to use social media? What do you want to achieve? Do you want to brand your company or do you want to establish yourself as a brand or as an expert? Or do you want to leverage the power of social media to find a job?

Identify your target audience
Once you know what you want to achieve, you can now define your target audience. Are you looking for work? HR managers and companies use LinkedIn to find new employees or freelancers. If you want to launch or support a cause or start a social campaign, your audience is mainly on Facebook. If you want to build your brand, the general public is your target audience.

Determine your USP
To be successful, you need to analyze both your strengths and your weaknesses. Define your Unique Selling Point (USP) – each one of us has unique assets (e.g., experience, skills, offering a great product/service).

Identify the best social media to succeed
For entertainers such as musicians, YouTube is ideal. Job seekers are advised to use LinkedIn and Xing. For cause marketing, Facebook is the best choice. Twitter is excellent for branding. For market research, all social media are effective to get quick and reliable results.

Formulate your strategy
Using social media means building an online presence. To be successful, a strategy must be formulated that outline how you want to present yourself, build your brand or represent your company. Decide on the content of your message (links, tweets, posting) and the frequency (monthly, weekly, daily, ongoing).

Stay active
Social media are real-time. Users must stay active to get their message across. You need to keep on communicating with your target audience.

Check what works – does your target audience find you? Do you get positive feedback?

Do you need to invest in promotion such as advertisements? Do you need to leverage Word of Mouth (WOM)? Do you need to adjust your strategy?

Want to learn more about social marketing? Sign up for our marketing & MarCom course!

Email: training@ourbestwords.com
Tel. 02-656 3369
Mobile: 054-810 8918, 050-529 0775
Website: www.ourbestwords.com
(Image courtesy of www.hetemeel.com)

Marketing writing is not new. For centuries, economists and the like have published great marketing material.

One of the best examples is Bastiat’s magnificent satire, The Candlemakers’ Petition, in which candle makers petition the French government for protection against competition from the sun.

A PETITION From the Manufacturers of Candles,clip_image001 Tapers, Lanterns, sticks, Street Lamps, Snuffers, and Extinguishers, and from Producers of Tallow, Oil, Resin, Alcohol, and Generally of Everything Connected with Lighting.

To the Honourable Members of the Chamber of Deputies.

Gentlemen:

You are on the right track.
You reject abstract theories and little regard for abundance and low prices.
You concern yourselves mainly with the fate of the producer.
You wish to free him from foreign competition, that is, to reserve the domestic market for domestic industry.
We come to offer you a wonderful opportunity for your — what shall we call it?
Your theory? No, nothing is more deceptive than theory. Your doctrine? Your system? Your principle?
But you dislike doctrines, you have a horror of systems, as for principles, you deny that there are any in political economy; therefore we shall call it your practice — your practice without theory and without principle.
We are suffering from the ruinous competition of a rival who apparently works under conditions so far superior to our own for the production of light that he is flooding the domestic market with it at an incredibly low price; for the moment he appears, our sales cease, all the consumers turn to him, and a branch of French industry whose ramifications are innumerable is all at once reduced to complete stagnation.

This rival, which is none other than the sun, is waging war on us so mercilessly we suspect he is being stirred up against us by perfidious Albion (excellent diplomacy nowadays!), particularly because he has for that haughty island a respect that he does not show for us.

We ask you to be so good as to pass a law requiring the closing of all windows, dormers, skylights, inside and outside shutters, curtains, casements, bull’s-eyes, deadlights, and blinds — in short, all openings, holes, chinks, and fissures through which the light of the sun is wont to enter houses, to the detriment of the fair industries with which, we are proud to say, we have endowed the country, a country that cannot, without betraying ingratitude, abandon us today to so unequal a combat.
Be good enough, honorable deputies, to take our request seriously, and do not reject it without at least hearing the reasons that we have to advance in its support.

First, if you shut off as much as possible all access to natural light, and thereby create a need for artificial light, what industry in France will not ultimately be encouraged?
If France consumes more tallow, there will have to be more cattle and sheep, and, consequently, we shall see an increase in cleared fields, meat, wool, leather, and especially manure, the basis of all agricultural wealth.
If France consumes more oil, we shall see an expansion in the cultivation of the poppy, the olive, and rapeseed. These rich yet soil-exhausting plants will come at just the right time to enable us to put to profitable use the increased fertility that the breeding of cattle will impart to the land.
Our moors will be covered with resinous trees. Numerous swarms of bees will gather from our mountains the perfumed treasures that today waste their fragrance, like the flowers from which they emanate. Thus, there is not one branch of agriculture that would not undergo a great expansion.

The same holds true of shipping. Thousands of vessels will engage in whaling, and in a short time we shall have a fleet capable of upholding the honor of France and of gratifying the patriotic aspirations of the undersigned petitioners, chandlers, etc.
But what shall we say of the specialties of Parisian manufacture?

Henceforth you will behold gilding, bronze, and crystal in candlesticks, in lamps, in chandeliers, in candelabra sparkling in spacious emporia compared with which those of today are but stalls.
There is no needy resin-collector on the heights of his sand dunes, no poor miner in the depths of his black pit, who will not receive higher wages and enjoy increased prosperity.

It needs but a little reflection, gentlemen, to be convinced that there is perhaps not one Frenchman, from the wealthy stockholder of the Anzin Company to the humblest vendor of matches, whose condition would not be improved by the success of our petition.
We anticipate your objections, gentlemen; but there is not a single one of them that you have not picked up from the musty old books of the advocates of free trade. We defy you to utter a word against us that will not instantly rebound against yourselves and the principle behind all your policy.

Will you tell us that, though we may gain by this protection, France will not gain at all, because the consumer will bear the expense?

We have our answer ready:
You no longer have the right to invoke the interests of the consumer.
You have sacrificed him whenever you have found his interests opposed to those of the producer. You have done so in order to encourage industry and to increase employment.
For the same reason you ought to do so this time too.
Indeed, you yourselves have anticipated this objection.

When told that the consumer has a stake in the free entry of iron, coal, sesame, wheat, and textiles, “Yes,” you reply, “but the producer has a stake in their exclusion.”
Very well, surely if consumers have a stake in the admission of natural light, producers have a stake in its interdiction.
But,” you may still say, “the producer and the consumer are one and the same person. If the manufacturer profits by protection, he will make the farmer prosperous. Contrariwise, if agriculture is prosperous, it will open markets for manufactured goods.”

Very well, If you grant us a monopoly over the production of lighting during the day, first of all we shall buy large amounts of tallow, charcoal, oil, resin, wax, alcohol, silver, iron, bronze, and crystal, to supply our industry; and, moreover, we and our numerous suppliers, having become rich, will consume a great deal and spread prosperity into all areas of domestic industry.

Will you say that the light of the sun is a gratuitous gift of Nature, and that to reject such gifts would be to reject wealth itself under the pretext of encouraging the means of acquiring it?

But if you take this position, you strike a mortal blow at your own policy; remember that up to now you have always excluded foreign goods because and in proportion as they approximate gratuitous gifts. You have only half as good a reason for complying with the demands of o
ther monopolists as you have for grantin
g our petition, which is in complete accord with your established policy; and to reject our demands precisely because they are better founded than anyone else’s would be tantamount to accepting the equation: + x + = -; in other words, it would be to heap absurdity upon absurdity.

Labor and Nature collaborate in varying proportions, depending upon the country and the climate, in the production of a commodity.

The part that Nature contributes is always free of charge; it is the part contributed by human labor that constitutes value and is paid for.
If an orange from Lisbon sells for half the price of an orange from Paris, it is because the natural heat of the sun, which is, of course, free of charge, does for the former what the latter owes to artificial heating, which necessarily has to be paid for in the market.

Thus, when an orange reaches us from Portugal, one can say that it is given to us half free of charge, or, in other words, at half price as compared with those from Paris.
Now, it is precisely on the basis of its being semigratuitous (pardon the word) that you maintain it should be barred.

You ask: “How can French labor withstand the competition of foreign labor when the former has to do all the work, whereas the latter has to do only half, the sun taking care of the rest?” But if the fact that a product is half free of charge leads you to exclude it from competition, how can its being totally free of charge induce you to admit it into competition?

Either you are not consistent, or you should, after excluding what is half free of charge as harmful to our domestic industry, exclude what is totally gratuitous with all the more reason and with twice the zeal.

To take another example:
When a product — coal, iron, wheat, or textiles — comes to us from abroad, and when we can acquire it for less labor than if we produced it ourselves, the difference is a gratuitous gift that is conferred up on us.
The size of this gift is proportionate to the extent of this difference. It is a quarter, a half, or three-quarters of the value of the product if the foreigner asks of us only three-quarters, one-half, or one-quarter as high a price.
It is as complete as it can be when the donor, like the sun in providing us with light, asks nothing from us.

The question, and we pose it formally, is whether what you desire for France is the benefit of consumption free of charge or the alleged advantages of onerous production. Make your choice, but be logical; for as long as you ban, as you do, foreign coal, iron, wheat, and textiles, in proportion as their price approaches zero, how inconsistent it would be to admit the light of the sun, whose price is zero all day long!

(Image courtesy of Instituto Ludwig von Mises Brazil)

As we all know that social marketing is the current and future marketing trend. It has several advantages compared to classic marketing:

Higher level of transparency

Customers, prospect, business partners, and employees are googling for information: e.g., legal complications, background, experience, recommendations. Companies therefore need to be transparent in order to build and maintain trust with their suppliers, customers, employees, stakeholders and target audience. Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs are perfect to inform and communicate in real time.

Promotion is far less intrusive

Customers resent aggressive ads that are intrusive and interrupt. Smart companies know the behavior pattern of their target audience and make sure to engage them in a smart way with their brand. Social media provide a great promotion channel, since the target audience has control over how and when to be exposed to brand and product promotion.

Focus on target audience, not the business itself

Good marketing is interactive. Marketing campaigns should be aimed at and interacting with the target audience. Any campaign launched by the company must be built on the target audience, not the business itself.

Integrates online video

Video and mobile marketing are gaining ground. More and more companies are creating their own online video content. Especially testimonials and endorsements are powerful tools. They are easy to create and posting them on YouTube ensures instant and free promotion.

 

It rocks

Social marketing provides a golden marketing opportunity, but it must be done properly. It must therefore have repeatability; a one-time effort is not only a waste of time, but would also build false expectations and could therefore easily backfire. Needless to say, in the online marketing arena, any campaign must be relevant and memorable. The power of any online marketing campaign is its ability to go viral.

Leveraging new concepts
Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and YouTube are here to stay, so leverage them. More and more individuals and companies around the world are adopting them. They provide agile channels to reach potential customers, build brand loyalty, to keep connected with customers, and to find out what competitors are up to.

Cost-effective

The main expense for managing a social media platform is time when done in-house. But it must be correctly – it must remain relevant, consistent and persistent. Many companies therefore prefer to outsource.

Want to learn more about social media? Contact Our Best Words at info@ourbestwords.com

clip_image002Technical Documentation has been around for several centuries. Especially with the continuous launch and upgrade of technically advanced products and services, user guides and technical descriptions are needed.

Who was the first technical writer? Quite likely Cro-Magnon man when was drawing on his cave walls. However, most experts would agree that technical documentation appeared as early as the 14th century.

Geoffrey Chaucer detailed the purpose and operation of a navigation device. Copernicus, Hippocrates, Newton and Leonardo da Vinci wrote explanatory notes to demonstrate the use of their inventions. All these publications can be seen as technical documentation.

But the golden age of technical writing started with the invention of the computer and the need for mass technical documentation. It started during World War II with the major technological upgrade manufacturing weapons and the creation of nuclear technologies.

Modern day technical documentation is linked to computer science in general and internet in particular. Needless to say, the growth in technology users has sparked the need for technical documentation.

The growth in technical products and services has created the demand for professional documentation. This has created a new profession: technical writing. A good technical writer is an honest mediator between people who create technology and who use technology.

The domain of technical writers has recently expanded to a more interactive (Web 2.0, wikis) one. Technical writing has evolved from pure technical writing into technical communicating.

Want to learn more? Want to join the technical writing evolution? Contact Our Best Words at info@ourbestwords.com or call us at (972) 02-656-3369 or 1-786-507-8206

One of our students at Our Best Words, clip_image001Yehudit Rouzaud, wrote a great blog post: “Cleaning My Head While Cleaning for Pesach”. Not only is the blog post nicely crafted, it is also entertaining, and fits our upcoming Chag.

The Our Best Words team wishes you and your loved ones a wonderful Pesach. Enjoy reading Yehudit’s blog post below!

Cleaning My Head While Cleaning for Pesach

“Moving from room to room, drawer to drawer, shelf to shelf turning over each, wiping down every area in the yearly hunt for chometz, I only find some token stashes of candy in the boys’ room. The days of cereal poked into the air conditioner vents by tiny hands to spray across the Seder table when the air conditioner timer turned on, generating pandemonium, sheilot and memories are gone, at least until the grandchildren come. Nevertheless, I marvel at how much stuff I find that seemed very important to keep “just in case” that I haven’t put a hand on or given a single thought to since I put it away. It doesn’t take care of me now and isn’t likely to do in the future, but I spend all kinds of time and effort taking care of it. When I made Aliyah, I jettisoned so much to make my way light; but I seem to have replaced it all. Yet the idea of redistributing what might be useful to others or plain throwing it away lot of true garbage makes me feel amazingly insecure. It’ not just that it’s easier not to bother to throw away the empty bag or outgrown shirt; it actually hurts.

Apparently I’ve absorbed more than I thought of my mother’s worldview, formed from growing up poor in the middle of the Great Depression that made a first-degree felony from discarding anything that might have a potential use at any possible future time. We laughed at her when she saved hundreds of egg crates and strung them together to make a bathroom partition around the basement toilet and made fun of her as she saved every rubber band, twist-tie, slightly used aluminum foil (separated by chalavi and basari of course) or bit of string in several kitchen drawers (while helping ourselves whenever we needed to without thinking twice. There were always rubber bands. I was 40 before I went into a store and bought a bag of rubber bands (which I still have….), but at least you could see a point and admire her creativity.

The reflex amused us less when she filled a two- car garage floor to ceiling with 50 years of old school supplies left when she retired from a half-century of teaching plus box upon box of yarn and crafts supplies picked up because “they were such good bargains”, that made splendid nests for generations of rats that we heard scrabbling, scratching and squeaking on the shelves through the walls when we sat in the family room at night, but mostly never found their way into any project. Her solution to running out of space? Build another 2-car garage, which I understand, is well on its way to being filled with junk as well. At 75, unable to permit herself to escape to the comfort of a smaller and more appropriate home because she can’t bear to part with a single cabinet full of curios and artwork or the moldering piles of rotting crafts supplies, arthritic, and unable to keep up with the chores demanded to maintain all that, the house owns her.

No surprise – after all, 80% of the Jews couldn’t manage to free themselves from life as they knew it enough to leave Egypt. And the rest were ready to run back if they could just get onions. Things, especially familiar things, have a powerful pull, better than chains.

I am reminded of a story about a mixed group of construction workers, white and Indian, employed to build the Hoover Dam nearly a century ago. An accident resulted in a breech in the dam turning loose a torrential wall of water that oddly enough, only the Indians workers escaped. When asked what happened, the Indians said that when they saw the flood bearing down on them, they ran and survived. Their white co-workers ran back to save their belongings and drowned. Thinking about the weight of things and who actually owns whom, I brought an armload of trash bags into the bedrooms and began to fill them.”

(Image courtesy of www.ohr.edu)

Course participants can now apply for a grant from the Misrad HaKlita

Jerusalem – March 30, 2011 – Our Best Words (OBW), a Jerusalem-based company providing technical writing services and training, announced today that it has received approval from the Ministry of Absorption (Misrad HaKlita). This means that students who want to attend any of OBW’s technical writing, marketing writing, as well as MarCom courses at the Association of Americans & Canadians in Israel (AACI www.aaci.org.il) could be eligible for special training grants (“vouchers”) from the Ministry of Absorption.

“Immigrants who have been in Israel for less than 10 years have now the opportunity to attend our courses to enhance their careers,” said Ephraim King, CEO of Our Best Words. “This recognition follows the official approval we already received from Betuach Leumi (The National Insurance Institute – www.btl.gov.il ).”

The Ministry of Absorption provides assistance through grants (“vouchers”) in order to facilitate vocational absorption for new immigrants/returning residents, to expand the range of choices available to eligible candidates for placement in the job market, and to allow them to maximize their skills based on their education, experience and abilities.

(For more information, please visit: http://www.moia.gov.il/Moia_en/Employment/VoucherProject.htm

About Our Best Words
Our Best Words (OBW) specializes in providing quality technical communications to customers worldwide. The Company enjoys close relationships with a broad range of businesses – from startups to Fortune 500 companies. Offerings include corporate technical documentation, localization, technical communication, and technical marketing services worldwide. The Our Best Words team is comprised of experienced and dedicated professionals with years of experience in technical and marketing communications.

For more information or to sign up for a course, please contact:

Our Best Words Main Office: 02-656-3369
US & Canada: 1-786-507-8206
Ephraim King, CEO: 050-529-0775
Tracey Shipley, Marketing Coordinator: 054-810-8918
Email: info@ourbestwords.com
Website: www.ourbestwords.com

All courses are conducted in English and
are open for Olim as well as veterans.

Jerusalem, March 27 2011 – Our Best Words (OBW), a Jerusalem-based company providing technical writing services and training, announced today that it is launching new technical and marketing writing, as well as MarCom courses at the premises of the Association of Americans & Canadians in Israel (AACI) in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Netanya, Beer Sheva, and the Galilee. (For more information about the AACI, please visit the AACI website at: www.aaci.org.il)

The course “Introduction to Marketing Communications (MarCom)” will start on May 4, 2011. This course will consist of four sessions on Wednesdays from 5:00pm-9:00pm at AACI Jerusalem and will also include the professional use of Power Point by Marketing Communicators. After completion, graduates can proceed to an advanced MarCom course that will be offered later this summer.

Upon successful completion of this advanced course, our students will have the skill set to handle the aspects of marketing communications and marketing writing,” said Ephraim King, CEO of Our Best Words. “They will be able to leverage their skills in all kinds of companies and organizations, including Business to Business (B2B), Business to Customers (B2C), and non-profits.”

Financial details:

Introductory Course (four sessions of 4 hours each):
₪ 990 (10% discount for AACI members)
Advanced Course (twelve sessions of 4 hours each):
₪ 2,900 (10% discount for AACI members)

Immigrants who have been in Israel for less than 10 years could be eligible for special training grants (“vouchers”) from the Ministry of Absorption. (For more information, please visit: http://www.moia.gov.il/Moia_en/Employment/VoucherProject.htm

About Our Best Words
Our Best Words (OBW) specializes in providing quality technical communications to customers worldwide. The Company enjoys close relationships with a broad range of businesses – from startups to Fortune 500 companies. Offerings include corporate technical documentation, localization, technical communication, and technical marketing services worldwide. The Our Best Words team is comprised of experienced and dedicated professionals with years of experience in technical and marketing communications.

For more information or to sign up for a course, please contact:

Our Best Words Main Office: 02-656-3369
US & Canada: 1-786-507-8206
Ephraim King, CEO: 050-529-0775
Tracey Shipley, Marketing Coordinator: 054-810-8918
Email: info@ourbestwords.com
Website: www.ourbestwords.com